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3 edition of economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia found in the catalog.

economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia

Jenne H. de Beer

economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia

  • 240 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Netherlands Committee for IUCN in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Asia, Southeastern.
    • Subjects:
    • Non-timber forest products -- Asia, Southeastern.,
    • Non-timber forest products -- Economic aspects -- Asia, Southeastern.,
    • Non-timber forest products industry -- Asia, Southeastern.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-189).

      StatementJenne H. de Beer, Melanie J. McDermott ; editor to the second edition, Jenne H. de Beer.
      ContributionsMcDermott, Melanie J.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSD543.3.A785 B44 1996
      The Physical Object
      Pagination197 p. :
      Number of Pages197
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL288328M
      ISBN 109075909012
      LC Control Number97192180
      OCLC/WorldCa37312993

        South East Asia is home to some of the most biodiverse forests in the world, but suffers from one of the highest deforestation rates in the world. Partnerships for Forests supports partners in the region who aim to create value from standing forests through sustainable means.   The economic value of Non-Timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia, with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. Amsterdam: Netherlands Committee for IUCN. Amsterdam: Netherlands Committee for by: 1. Society and Non-timber Forest Product isn Tropical Asia edited by Jefferson Fox EAST-WEST CENTER Forest products—Asia—Congresses 2 Fores. t. management— cant to rural and national economies and that these products are of greatest economic value . Downloadable (with restrictions)! Debates on linking livelihoods and conservation through the commercialization of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) continue to hold significance considering the increasing market demand for NTFPs, its high economic value for forest-dependent communities and “enabling” neoliberal policies that are in place.


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economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia by Jenne H. de Beer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book: The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia No ed. pp pp. Abstract: The collection collection Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details of minor forest products, animals, plants and things a forest produces, besides timber, has many potential benefits for the people living in or adjacent to forests.

Get this from a library. The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia: with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. [Jenne H de Beer; Melanie J McDermott]. Get this from a library. The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia.

[Jenne H de Beer; Melanie J McDermott]. The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand Complete Title: The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and ThailandCited by: THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF NON-TIMBER FOREST PRODUCTS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA [Jenne H.

de Beer] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF NON-TIMBER FOREST PRODUCTS IN SOUTHEAST ASIAAuthor: Jenne H. de Beer. Book: The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia: with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand pp pp.

Abstract: Minor forest products, i.e. all animal, plant and other forest products other than timber, are important to the many people exploiting these resources to meet their basic by: The book, which gives special attention to the importance of non-timber forest products for the more than 30 million forest-dependent people in Southeast Asia, has already proven to be stimulating reading for all those concerned with forest conservation and sustainable forest use.

In Southeast Asia, but also in many other parts of the by: The Economic Value of Non-Timber Forest Products—A Case Study from Malaysia.

April ; Products in Southeast Asia. Netherlands Committee for IUCN, Amsterdam. Dove, M.R. The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia: with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.

The economic value of non. De Beer JH, McDermott M () The economic value of non-timber forest products in South East Asia.

The Netherlands Committee for IUCN, Amsterdam Google Scholar De Beer JH, McDermott M () The economic value of Cited by: the economic value of non-timber forest products in southeast asia "The Economic Value of Non Timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia" is a fully revised and extended version of a report with the same title, which was first published by the Netherlands Committee for IUCN in 1.

Introduction NTFPs as Important Provisioning Ecosystem Service. There is growing evidence that non-timber-forest-products (NTFPs) contribute significantly to maintain livelihoods in rural Africa, Asia and elsewhere in developing countries (Campbell and Luckert,Cavendish,Cocks et al.,Shackleton and Shackleton,Viet Quang and Nam Anh, ).Cited by:   The forest fire in eastern Borneo resulted in enormous losses of timber and non-timber production (estimated at over $6 billion—more than the export value of all forest products from Indonesia over two years) as well as increased soil erosion, local climatic changes, and extinction of species (Leighton and Wirawan ).Author: Theodore Panayotou.

Diospyros melanoxylon Non-timber forest products play a significant role in livelihoods around the world, providing critical subsistence and trade goods for forest and other communities. However, in most countries the governance of this important but broad category of products has been ineffective or counter-productive to the objectives of sustainability and livelihood improvement.

4 Forest cover change in Southeast Asia 6 Main forest formations 6 Forest change rates in Southeast Asia 6 5 The regional pattern of forest change in Southeast Asia 9 The change pattern in continental Southeast Asia 12 Conversion of forest cover 12 Change of forest canopy or structure 17Cited by: 2.

The Economic value of non-timber forest products in southeast Asia with emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. De Beer, J. and Mc Dermott, M.

Non-timber forest products. In: De Beer (e d.), 2nd edition. The economic value of non-timber forest products in. The Economic Value of Non-timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia, with Emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.

Amsterdam, Netherlands Committee for IUCN. Amsterdam, Netherlands Committee for IUCN. Beer, J. de and McDermott, M. () The Economic Value of Non-Timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia, World Conservation Union (IUCN), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Google Scholar Bennett, B. (a) Plants and people of the Amazonian by: 6. Non-timber forest products. Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) generate significant income across local to regional tropical markets, not to mention their domestic use for subsistence (Laird, ). For instance, NTFP markets in Indonesia were worth US$ million annually in the early s (de Jong and Mendelsohn, ).Author: Bruno X.

Pinho, Carlos A. Peres, Carlos A. Peres, Inara R. Leal, Marcelo Tabarelli. The paper reviewed the methods in use for the economic valuation of Non-timber forest products. In the main, three methods are used. They are direct market price, indirect market price and non-market estimates.

No method is superior to the other but appropriate method of valuation depends on the objective of the study. The paper reviewed the methods in use for the economic valuation of Non-timber forest products. In the main, three methods are used. They are direct market price, indirect market price and non-market estimates.

No method is superior to the other but appropriate method of valuation depends on the objective of the study. Also in use, is the financial valuation method. Since the s, there has been debate around the contribution of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) promising economic benefit from an intact forest cover 1 Livelihood refers to ‘a level of wealth and stocks and flows of food and cash which provide for physical and social well being (Chambers in Brown et al ).File Size: KB.

The Economic Value of Non-Timber Forest Products in South East Asia. The Netherlands Committee for IUCN, Amsterdam. DEFO, L. Rattan exploitation in the Yaounde region of Cameroon. In: SUNDERLAND, T. et NDOYE O. (eds) Forest products.

Livelihoods and Conservation: Case studies of Non-Timber Forest Products Systems. Volume 2. Africa: The catalyst for this book was a workshop held in Cianjur, Indonesia. Andrew Ingles and members of the Southeast Asia Non-Timber Forest Product Network helped to organise the meeting and guide the development of the book.

We are very grateful to them and to the contributors to this volume. We hope that the book will serve as an. Chapter 6: Smallholder Forest Management: Looking Beyond Non-Timber Forest Products Christine Padoch and Miguel Pinedo-Vasquez Chapter 7: Household Extractive Economies Mauro W.B.

Almeida Chapter 8: Developing Research Frames for Non-Timber Forest Products Experience from Ghana Julia Falconer v Front pages 6/24/98 PM Page 5File Size: 2MB. The market for forest products continues to grow given the changes in forest products value chains in the Asia-Pacific region. This holds true for both the non-timber and timber ‘worlds.’ Aside from the increasingly transnational nature of trade, the role READ MORE».

Rattan (from the Malay rotan) is the name for roughly species of old world climbing palms belonging to subfamily Calamoideae (from the Greek 'kálamos' = reed).

Rattan is also known as manila, or malacca, named after the ports of shipment Manila and Malacca City, and as manau (from the Malay rotan manau, the trade name for Calamus manan canes in Southeast Asia). Journal of Ethnopharmacology, pp.

THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF NON-TIMBER FOREST PRODUCTS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA "The Economic Value of Non Timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia" is a fully revised and extended version of a report with the same title, which was first published by the Netherlands Committee for IUCN in 5.

Beer, J. and M. McDermott (): “The Economic Value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia”, IUCN, Netherlands Committee, Amsterdam.

Bluffstone, R. (): “The effect of labor market performance on deforestation in developing countries under open access: an example from rural Nepal”,Journal ofFile Size: KB.

Non-timber forest products have often been held out as potential tools for conservation and sustainable development, but sustainability assessments are frequently difficult and time-consuming, especially in conflict areas. Thus, rapid assessments can be useful in providing a broad overview of the harvesting system in order to generate meaningful conservation or.

DE BEER, J. H., AND M. MC DERMOTT. Economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia. The Hague: Council for the International Union of the Conser- vation of Nature. DOVE, MICHAEL. Swidden agriculture, or The political economy of ignorance. Agroforestry Systems timber and non-timber forest products in Nepal, followed by a discourse on NTFPs.

We explicate the flip side of NTFP discourse to help the stakeholders to harness the often missed opportunities from the forestry sector, rather than engaging only in discursive spheres. Finally, the discussion and conclusion are presented. STATUS AND ECONOMIC.

↑ "Forest Research - Social, cultural and economic values of contemporary non-timber forest products: Wild Harvests". Retrieved ↑ "non timber forest products in Scotland". ForestHarvest. Retrieved 1 2 "Forests and non-timber forest products". Retrieved Daniggelis, Ephrosine.

Hidden wealth: the survival strategy of Foraging Farmers in the Upper Arun Vallery, Eastern Nepal. Mandala Book Point, Kathmandu, Nepal. deBeer, Jenne H. and Melanie J. McDermott The Economic calue of Non-Timber Forest Products in Southeast Asia with Emphasis on Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.

The objective of this paper is to institute farmers’ own perceptions of the on-and off-farm benefits of agroforestry systems (AFS). Using use value approach, this paper presents empirical evidence on the use values of three types of AFS practiced by the refugees and their hosting communities in Eastern Sudan.

The total economic value (TEV) was applied as a Cited by: 1. Socio-Economic Research on Non-Timber Forest Products in the Pacific Northwest Susan J.

Alexander Rebecca J. McLain Keith A. Blatner SUMMARY. The non-timber forest products industry in the Pacific Northwest has been viable for nearly a century. Although it is a small part of the regional economy, the industry involves many people in the.

Benefits of Biotic Pollination for Non-Timber Forest Products and Cultivated Plants. Shiny Rehel 1, In a study of tropical monsoon forests in Southeast Asia, Kato et al. found that 51 per cent The economic value of non-timber forest products in Southeast Asia. Amsterdam: Netherlands Committee for IUCN.

My favourite research has been that on the economic value of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFP) in Thungyai Naresuan, back in the days when I did my Post-Doctoral at the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies of Kyoto University. I am forever grateful to Prof.

Yoko Hayami for supporting my application and to JSPS for financing it. Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are the primary resources from forests in developing countries [1,2,3].Extraction of non-timber forest products for both subsistence and trade remains common and widespread today because it is highly significant to the rural and national economies in provision of food, material, construction, energy, cash income, employment, and other Cited by: 2.

Introduction Forests1 and trees outside of forests have ensured the food security and nutrition of human populations since time immemorial. Throughout the world, forests and associated ecosystems have been managed to enhance their production of a vast array of wild, semi-domesticated and domesticated foods, including fruits, nuts, tubers, leafy vegetables, Cited by: 3.

INTRODUCTION. Tropical forest goods and services are often surrounded by emerging markets linking remote communities with major urban centers, nationally and internationally (Nkem et al.

).FAO estimated that the value of NTFPs extracted from forests worldwide amounted to US$ billion in ).In addition, it is widely acknowledged that non Cited by: 5. Enterprises in non-timber forest products need support to develop into creative and cultural industries within ASEAN, particularly in sectors where they already have an edge.

Institutionalisation of enterprise development and value-chain programs within social forestry, with accompanying capacity building, need to be prioritised.2 economic activity, and its non-use value to people who derive satisfaction the mere existence of a resource, even though they may never see it or consume any product obtained from it (Pearce et al ).

Examples of direct use values in forestry include timber and File Size: 56KB.